The Status of the CAP Industry in 2023: What You Need to Know

The Status of the CAP Industry in 2023: What You Need to Know

As we enter 2023, the construction industry is poised for a major shift with the increasing adoption of connected autonomous plant (CAP) technology. While the promise of CAP offers many benefits, such as remote data collection, semi-autonomous material handling, and offsite/robotic construction, challenges remain in terms of standardisation, legislation, and investment.

Despite the excitement about the potential of CAP, there is concern about the speed and feasibility of implementation, as well as the associated risks and liabilities.

In this article, we’ll break down some of the current challenges in the market, including legislation, finance and investment, equipment manufacturers, digital and data techniques, and ubiquitous connectivity. By understanding the current state of play, we can better prepare for the future of construction with CAP technology.

The State of Play

The promise of CAP offers many benefits such as remote data collection, geofencing, semi-autonomous material handling, and offsite/robotic construction. However, this transformation presents challenges as there is a lack of a uniform approach and practice varies across sites, clients and manufacturers, resulting in inconsistent deployment and slow information flow.

Despite excitement about the potential of CAP, there is concern about the speed and feasibility of implementation and the lack of direction and investment clarity. The industry faces the risk of investing in new systems without certainty about the technology’s capability and clarity about the associated risks and liabilities.

To help bring all of this together as a snapshot of the industry, we’ve broken down some of the challenges to help understand the current state of play.

Legislation

As with all “autonomous” and “driver-less” technology (see Tesla for a more mainstream example), there are myriad legislative challenges spanning insurance, ethics, standards and liabilities that have to be ironed out into a usable framework. This covers both safety concerns and also data and cybersecurity challenges involved in the sector. Our initial impression is that within the next 3 years, we will see new legislation proposed and industry consultations, alongside formal testbeds and reviews, with mandates and maturation of the framework within 10 years. Onwave is working with TRL (Transport Research Laboratory) on a project funded by National Highways to answer many of these regulatory questions to see what needs to be legislated and what can be delivered by industry with a ‘best practice’ approach.

Finance & Investment

In 2023, we’re seeing initial steps being taken to establish:

Alongside this clear financial incentive, there is a push to prove the quantitative and qualitative benefits of the technology over the next 3 years to then develop incentives and assistance for CAP uptake. We believe this will be reflected in the procurement process to support and reward CAP adoption in the next 7 years. We are seeing early adopters who are wanting to get first-mover status in this exciting new field and the market may well push these targets along faster than the plan

Equipment Manufacturers

As the technology itself already exists and is proven in other sectors, equipment manufacturer focus is largely on the evolving sensors and drones, alongside the data standardisation front as covered below. Over the next couple of years, there will be a push for the development of retrofittable solutions for surveying, control systems for operation, hazard recognition systems and asset recognition capability. There will also be a move toward streamlining the operator control booths and simulators.

The immediate focus over the next 5 years will be semi-autonomous plant, with trials, KPI and hardware being developed to support operator-led functionality with a parallel development of autonomous plant that will begin to become standardised and mandated from 2030. This will all be supported by updates to EN and ISO standards for plant to include autonomy.

Digital and Data Techniques

One of the key challenges of such a cutting-edge innovation is the rush for equipment manufacturers to develop their own intellectual property, which is often at odds with standardisation and interoperable telemetry. Although this technology exists in mining applications and many major manufacturers already have patents for this technology, there is a current drive to understand the telematic protocols and data collection with a view to standardising and subsequently creating new asset registers and construction databases.

Once this is completed, there will be a framework for data sharing, cyber and physical security and new certifications launched based on these new standards internationally

Ubiquitous Connectivity

CAP will require robust and widespread communication capabilities at construction sites.

A review of this is currently underway starting with identifying current and future communication needs and exploring existing solutions. Retrofitting the existing plant will speed up the implementation of this and testbed projects are in progress. Over the next 2 years, we’ll be involved in a deep review of communications infrastructure and analysis of cost-benefits for the comms networks, then designing the framework for this infrastructure post-analysis.

In addition, to ensure secure and reliable remote control or autonomous operation, a review of relevant legislation and regulation will guide the development of communication standards. This will lead to EN/ISO standards for communications, in line with the nationwide rollout of 5G. Local network connectivity is already being established, and there may be a need to allocate transmission spectrum to CAP or utilize space within evolving windows (such as Connected Autonomous Vehicles (CAV) and Connected Autonomous Machines (CAM.)

In the future, construction contracts will mandate the use of communication technologies after testing to understand their practical, commercial, and contractual implications. Plant will then routinely use such connectivity for autonomous or remote operation.

Why Choose Onwave as Your CAP Connectivity Partner?

At Onwave, we understand the challenges facing the construction industry as it navigates the complexities of connected autonomous plant technology. We are committed to providing innovative connectivity solutions that support the successful implementation and operation of CAP systems.

Our expertise in communications infrastructure, data management, and cybersecurity make us the ideal partner for companies looking to embrace the benefits of this cutting-edge technology while managing the associated risks. Contact us today to learn how we can help you prepare for the future of construction with connected autonomous plant.

Connected Autonomous Plant: Revolutionising Construction Safety and Productivity with Advanced Technology

Connected Autonomous Plant: Revolutionising Construction Safety and Productivity with Advanced Technology

As the construction industry in the UK continues to evolve, there is a growing need for the use of Connected Autonomous Plant (CAP) to revolutionise construction safety and productivity.

CAP refers to construction machinery that can operate independently without human intervention or be operated remotely. Equipped with sensors, GPS, and other advanced technologies, CAP has the potential to improve construction efficiency, reduce the risk of accidents and injuries, and lower labour costs. However, the adoption of CAP also requires careful planning and coordination to ensure the equipment is used safely and effectively.

In this article, we will explore the benefits of CAP, the elements needed to run autonomous plant equipment on a construction site, and the key steps involved in planning and implementing a CAP project.

What is CAP?

Connected Autonomous Plant, also known as self-driving plant or autonomous construction equipment, refers to construction machinery that is capable of being operated from a remote location or of operating independently without the need for human intervention. This can include a wide range of equipment, such as bulldozers, excavators, compactors/rollers, and more.

Safety is incredibly important in the railway industry, as it affects the well-being of workers, the public, and the success of railway operations. According to statistics from the UK’s Office of Rail and Road, in the year 2020-2021 there were 1,261 recorded incidents of objects “fouling” the track, which is a 3.4% increase from the previous year. This includes objects left on the track, but also objects falling from trains, and objects on nearby land or property that end up on the track. These incidents can cause delays, damage to trains and infrastructure, and even pose a risk to safety if a train collides with an object on the track.

Learn more about CAP from National Highways

Watch the National Highways Video on CAP

CAP Benefits

Most construction projects operate around three core objectives: enhancing safety, delivering projects efficiently and reducing carbon. Utilising technology in construction projects has the potential to positively impact all three objectives.

Supercharging Safety

Construction sites pose a significant risk to workers, with serious and sometimes fatal injuries resulting from incidents involving construction plant. By reducing the presence of workers in hazardous situations, we can save lives and improve overall well-being. Although technology to improve safety is available, it is not yet widely used on construction sites.

Less serious accidents including slips, trips and falls are also higher amongst plant operators, with 2000+ recorded accidents in 2008 mostly from ingress/egress to the vehicle (Source)

Powering-up Productivity

UK construction is known to have made limited productivity gains over the last 40 years projects are often digitally remote, meaning there have been significant barriers to “digital transformation” in the sector.

Improving productivity in the construction industry remains a challenge. It still lags behind other industries like mining, agriculture, retail and manufacturing that have seen significant improvements through better processes and technology and where they have already made progress towards automation.

Reducing Carbon

In addition to the safety and productivity benefits, technology and autonomy can ensure projects are delivered on time and on budget, can contribute to ESG goals such as CO2 emission reduction. CAP will also deliver in terms of Social Value and key areas such as diversity and employment targets.

Construction is set to be the next industry to adopt and integrate autonomous technology from the design phase onward to deliver projects safely, efficiently, on time and up to standard.

What is Needed to Run Autonomous Plant?

There are several elements that are needed to run autonomous plant equipment on a construction site.

1. Sensors and advanced technologies:
Autonomous plant equipment typically relies on sensors and other advanced technologies, such as GPS, lidar, and machine learning algorithms, to navigate and perform tasks on a construction site. These technologies enable the equipment to sense and understand its surroundings and make decisions based on that information in real-time.

2. Communication systems:
Autonomous plant equipment requires a reliable communication system to receive instructions, transmit and report on data, and communicate with other equipment and personnel on the construction site. This may include wireless networks, satellite systems, or other communication technologies.

3. Maintenance and repair:
All equipment requires regular maintenance and repair to ensure that it is operating at its best and CAP is no exception However, other industries that have adopted the technology have found that autonomous vehicles require much less maintenance as they are driven more precisely for a specific task and can be tweaked to optimise for gear changes, timing and speed, even differing weather conditions.

4. Training and support:
It is important for operators and maintenance personnel to have the necessary training and support to effectively use and maintain autonomous plant equipment. This may include training on how to operate the equipment, troubleshoot problems, and perform maintenance tasks.

The bandwidth requirement for an autonomous plant depends on various factors such as the size and complexity of the plant, the amount of data being generated and transmitted, the communication infrastructure, and the type of applications being used.

Some examples of bandwidth-intensive applications in an autonomous plant include real-time video surveillance, remote diagnostics, and predictive maintenance.

Autonomous plant requires a variety of sensors to function.

Some of the common sensors used in autonomous plants include:

● Image and video sensors: used for real-time monitoring and analysis of the plant operations
● Temperature, humidity and pressure sensors: used to monitor environmental conditions and ensure optimal operation of the equipment.
● Flow sensors: used to measure the flow of liquids and gases in the plant
● Position sensors: used to determine the position of moving parts and machinery
● Load cells and torque sensors: used to measure weight and force applied on objects.

In addition to sensors, autonomous plants also require advanced technologies such as:

● Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) algorithms: used for predictive maintenance, anomaly detection, and process optimization
● Internet of Things (IoT) technology: used to connect and integrate the various sensors and systems in the plant and enable real-time data collection and analysis
● Robotics and automation systems: used to automate various tasks and processes in the plant
● Cloud computing and big data analytics: used to store and analyze the large amounts of data generated by the sensors and systems in the plant.

These technologies work together to provide real-time monitoring, predictive maintenance, and optimised control of the plant operations.

The future of the construction industry and specifically the adoption and integration of autonomous plant requires pervasive, resilient, robust, high bandwidth and low latency connectivity across the project, as it will be many years before it is delivered UK-wide, therefore private connectivity solutions need to be considered to give the needed level of connectivity and cyber security. Solutions to consider include long-range Wi-Fi and Ofcom-licensed Private LTE and 5G networks

Autonomous Plant Project Planning

Onwave has been involved in discussions across a diverse stakeholder base, from equipment manufacturers to clients and government agencies concerning the rollout of connected autonomous plant projects. From this, we have learned that when planning your project, there are five key steps that take place.

The first stage of the process is to assess the overall connectivity specification demand for each site/project, regarding the CAP assets in place (or desired) and then the bandwidth and latency requirements plus all other associated failover and resilience requirements. Remember each plant manufacturer has differing requirements for their CAP solutions, sadly this is not a one size fits all project.

In addition to the more technical aspects of the requirement, a capability review of other supporting stakeholders such as IT and Operations staff should take place, to assess the requirement for managing and monitoring these innovations. This may also include the provision of managed services or training schedules for staff.

Once the assessment and audit are calculated and complete, the connectivity requirements can be determined and hardware, software and service specifications can be finalised.

The next stage is to create the connectivity infrastructure to support the new CAP machinery and supporting sensors/assets.

Finally, when the connectivity platform is in place, the existing plant can be retrofitted with the CAP technology to connect and control the machinery, as new autonomous plant is currently on long lead times from all manufacturers as they gear up production.

Ready for the Revolution?

Connected Autonomous Plant (CAP) has the potential to revolutionise the construction industry by improving safety, enhancing productivity, and contributing to ESG goals.

However, the adoption of CAP requires careful planning and coordination, including the implementation of advanced technologies such as sensors, AI, and IoT, as well as the creation of a reliable communication system and the provision of adequate training and support for personnel.

If you’re interested in exploring the benefits of Connected Autonomous Plant for your construction projects, don’t hesitate to contact us at Onwave. Our team of experts can help you assess your connectivity requirements and create a connectivity strategy to support your CAP ambitions. Let us help you improve safety, enhance productivity, and achieve your ESG goals through the use of advanced technologies. Contact us today to learn more.

Bridging the Skills Gap: How Connected Autonomous Plant Technology is Reshaping the Construction Workforce

Bridging the Skills Gap:
How Connected Autonomous Plant Technology is Reshaping the Construction Workforce

The construction industry is undergoing a transformation with the advent of connected autonomous plant technology. Connected autonomous plant refers to the use of advanced sensors, GPS technology and machine learning algorithms to create self-driving vehicles and equipment that can operate independently on construction sites.

This technology is changing the face of construction by making it more efficient, safer, and sustainable but alongside the technological “Platform” innovation in the construction industry, a key part of digital transformation is to embed this technology into “Processes” and crucially with the third “P”… People.

The UK construction industry has long been facing a skills gap, with a shortage of skilled workers in many areas. This has been caused by factors including an ageing workforce, low levels of investment in training and education and a lack of young people entering the industry. More specifically, a Construction Plant-hire Association (CPA) study concludes that more than four in ten (43%) construction plant workers are aged 45 and over. Conversely, fewer than one in ten (8%) are aged 24 or under.

This shortage has the potential to impact the industry’s ability to deliver major infrastructure projects on time and within budget, as well as the quality of construction work. To address the skills gap, the UK government has been working with industry bodies to invest in apprenticeships, training, and education programs to attract and train the next generation of construction workers.

According to recent statistics, the number of young people entering the construction industry in the UK has been declining. In 2019, only 6% of the construction workforce was aged under 25, compared to 15% in 1990.

The interim between the status quo of operator on-site plan control and the fully automated plan is the concept of operator remote control plant. This further strengthens the gender neutrality, flexibility, and youth-oriented push where a worker can commute to a regular office location (or even work from home) to complete their construction-based tasks regardless of site location. This is also more conducive to part-time/flexi-time working arrangements which are beneficial to all staff.

How Autonomous Plant Helps Solve the "people" problem

The construction industry offers many benefits for younger workers, such as

Job Security

Construction is a vital industry that is not easily outsourced, making it an attractive option for those seeking job security.

High Earning Potential

Construction work can be well-paying, especially for skilled tradespeople, making it an attractive option for young people seeking good salaries.

Positive Impact

Many young people see construction work as a way to make a positive impact on society by helping to build and maintain the infrastructure that communities rely on.

Apprenticeship

The opportunity to receive on-the-job training and apprenticeships in various construction trades is a motivator for many young people.

However, the additional motivational layers of working in an exciting, technologically advanced, cutting-edge field may sway more young people, often referred to as the “Playstation Generation” of digital natives towards the industry. This will also hopefully begin a new era in the construction sector of innovation being more readily and quickly adopted. Furthermore, the lack of location flexibility and tougher working conditions of being a plant operator may dissuade potential candidates from joining the profession – and a large part of this is removed from the role when CAP is deployed. It could be argued that operating CAP does not have intrinsic gender stereotypes and will lead to more women feeling that working in construction is an option due to more flexible working arrangements.

From Shortage to Success

Connected autonomous plant technology is playing a vital role in the construction industry by bridging the skills gap that the sector has been facing for years. By automating tasks and reducing the need for human intervention, CAP is reducing the reliance on skilled labour, which is in short supply.
This technology is also attracting a new generation of workers who are drawn to the innovative and dynamic nature of the construction industry. CAP technology is transforming the construction industry, not only by improving efficiency and productivity but also by building a better workforce for the future. It is also clear that businesses that invest in this technology will have a competitive edge in the future. However, making this transition can be challenging, as it relies on robust resilient connectivity to implement and operate. This is where the experts at Onwave come in. Our team of CAP specialists can help you navigate this transition, providing you with tailored connectivity solutions to meet your business’s unique needs.
Get in touch with us today to learn more about how we can help transform your workforce with connected autonomous plant technology.

Preventing Objects on the Line Incidents with Geofencing

Preventing Objects on the Line Incidents with Geofencing

The railway industry is one of the largest and most complex industries in the world, and Safety is a critical issue for all stakeholders involved. Despite efforts to ensure safety in railway operations, incidents involving objects on the line still occur, causing damage to equipment and infrastructure.

However, technology is now playing a crucial role in enhancing safety and preventing incidents related to object placement on railway lines. From geofencing technology to virtual and augmented reality training, new innovations are being developed to improve the safety of railway operations and prevent accidents.

In this article, we will delve into the latest geofencing technologies that are being used to prevent objects being left on the line following work activities and explore the ways in which they are helping to reduce the number of incidents on railway lines.

The Scale of the Safety Challenge

Safety is incredibly important in the railway industry, as it affects the well-being of workers, the public, and the success of railway operations. According to statistics from the UK’s Office of Rail and Road, in the year 2020-2021 there were 1,261 recorded incidents of objects “fouling” the track, which is a 3.4% increase from the previous year. This includes objects left on the track, but also objects falling from trains, and objects on nearby land or property that end up on the track. These incidents can cause delays, damage to trains and infrastructure, and even pose a risk to safety if a train collides with an object on the track.

The Rail Safety and Standards Board (RSSB) reports that, between April 2019 and March 2020, there were 114 collisions between trains and objects on the line, which resulted in 2 fatalities and 3 serious injuries. In addition, there were 19 derailments caused by objects on the line during the same period, which resulted in 7 fatalities and 8 serious injuries.

From April 2021-March 2022, there were 329 non-potentially high-risk train accidents (PHRTAs) on the mainline. This was largely attributed to a rise in trains ‘striking animals’ and ‘striking or running into other objects’, which together made up 72.9% of all non-PHRTAs.

The RSSB also reports that over the past decade, objects on the line have caused an average of 42 delays per day, with a total delay time of over 1.4 million minutes per year. This has a significant impact on the efficiency and reliability of railway operations, as well as causing frustration and inconvenience for passengers. Typical objects struck, include track trolleys and marker boards which can be inadvertently left in place following track works. These statistics highlight the importance of ensuring the safety of object placement on the railway lines and the need for effective safety measures to prevent accidents and delays. Geofencing technology can play a crucial role in improving safety and preventing incidents on the railway lines.

Supercharging Safety with OWL

Onwave has developed our own geofencing platform, OWL, to enhance track worker safety and address the safety challenge of objects on the line. OWL is a location-based system that uses geofencing technology to aid in improving railway safety. This system helps teams to visualise and understand their surroundings and the equipment they work with, such as marking out hazards like excavated areas and buried services and alerting users to their presence. OWL has many safety features, however two that are critical for ‘object on the line’ timed zones and the ability for Supervisors to have a Live View of their people and equipment on site in real time.

Timed Zones

Timed zones are a feature of the OWL geofencing technology platform that can be configured to enhance safety in railway operations. These zones can be set up for both people and geo-tagged objects, such as construction equipment or maintenance vehicles.

The purpose of timed zones is to forewarn teams of potential hazards and ensure that objects are placed safely, away from the line at critical moments in time. This can be particularly useful in situations where work is being carried out in close proximity to the railway line or where objects need to be moved onto or off the track.

When using a timed zone, an alert can be sent to everyone within the work site to warn of a possession coming to an end and can trigger specific alerts including exact location for any people or items of plant or equipment remaining on the line once the possession has completed.

Management Insight

One of the main features of OWL is the ability to immediately locate objects on the interactive Live View map in real time.

This helps to ensure that field teams have all the information they need at their fingertips, and can make informed decisions about how to work safely and efficiently to manage work and their assets on the rail line.

When using a timed zone, an alert can be sent to everyone within the work site to warn of a possession coming to an end and can trigger specific alerts including exact location for any people or items of plant or equipment remaining on the line once the possession has completed.

Upgrade Your Safety Technology

In conclusion, geofencing technology is a valuable tool for enhancing railway safety, particularly when it comes to object placement on the line. The statistics show that incidents involving objects on the line can have a significant impact on the safety, reliability, and efficiency of railway operations.

Geofencing provides real-time monitoring, alerts, and data tracking to ensure a safer work environment. By setting virtual boundaries, geofencing helps keep workers informed of potential hazards and can quickly alert managers to any incidents involving objects on the line. This enables railway companies to take appropriate action to prevent accidents, injuries, and delays.
By using OWL, railway companies and contractors can improve their overall safety record, reduce the number of accidents caused by objects on the line, and increase the efficiency of their operations. This not only protects workers and passengers but also helps to prevent damage to infrastructure and reduce delays and disruptions of incidents caused by objects left on the line.

If you’re interested in learning more about how geofencing can benefit your railway operations, why not schedule a demo today? With a demo, you can see the technology in action and get a better understanding of how it can improve your safety program. Speak to one of our team today and experience the benefits of geofencing for your railway projects.

Enhancing Safety and Preventing Human-Plant Interaction with Technology

Enhancing Safety by Preventing Human-Plant Interaction with Technology

The construction industry is one of the largest and most complex industries in the world, and safety is a critical issue for all stakeholders involved. Despite the efforts made to ensure the safety of construction workers, accidents, causing serious injuries and even fatalities, involving construction machinery still occur.

 

However, technology is now playing a crucial role in enhancing safety and preventing construction machinery-related accidents. From wearable technology and smart sensors to virtual and augmented reality training, new innovations are being developed to improve the safety of workers and prevent accidents.

 

In this article, we delve into the latest technologies being used to enhance safety in the construction industry. We explore the ways in which they are helping to reduce the number of accidents and injuries on construction sites.

The Scale of the Safety Challenge

Delivery construction projects safely is incredibly important, as it affects the well-being of workers, the public, and the overall success of a project. The construction industry is known to have a higher rate of workplace accidents and injuries compared to other industries, and the consequences can be severe and long-lasting.

The scale of the safety challenge is extensive, but the construction industry stands out as one of the most dangerous based on the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) statistics for fatal injuries.

This graph shows the main kinds of fatal accidents across industries, demonstrating the demand for safety measures to be increased on machinery and vehicles.

When moving away from fatal injuries, the picture from the report remains the same, demonstrating the dangers of moving objects and vehicles.

Beyond the Human Impact

Without seeking to minimise the human impact on these injuries, there is also an inevitable impact on projects and businesses from the number of injuries in the workplace overall.

The HSE state that 565,000 Workers sustained a non-fatal injury according to self-reports from the Labour Force Survey in 2021/22 (LFS) and 61,713 employee non-fatal injuries reported by employers in 2021/22 (RIDDOR.)

The sheer scale of the problem in terms of project continuity, alongside worker trust, is enormous, with millions of man-days lost each year due to injury based on these statistics from the Health and Safety Executive.

Implementing safe practices and procedures helps to prevent accidents and minimize risks on construction sites, ensuring that workers can carry out their tasks in a safe and healthy environment. This not only protects the workers but also helps to keep the project on schedule and within budget.

In addition, ensuring safety in construction can also enhance a company’s reputation and build trust with clients and the public. It demonstrates a commitment to responsible and ethical business practices and can lead to increased opportunities for future work.

Geofencing as a Safety Solution

Geofencing in the context of construction safety generally refers to the creation of virtual boundaries or barriers within or around a construction site which can be linked to the position of workers or plant through the use of positioning technologies (GPS,UWB or RFID) These positioning technologies can be used to monitor the movements of workers, vehicles, and equipment within the site, providing valuable information and alerting as they come into contact with the geofences, helping to improve safety and productivity.

For example, a geofence can be used to ensure that workers and vehicles are only allowed to enter specific areas of the site where it is safe for them to do so. If a worker or vehicle enters an unauthorised area, an alert can be triggered to alert management and/or safety personnel, allowing them to respond quickly to potential safety hazards.

In addition to improving safety, geofencing can also help construction companies to optimise their operations by providing real-time data on the movement of workers, vehicles, and equipment. This data can be used to identify bottlenecks, improve traffic flow, and allocate resources more efficiently.

Supercharging Safety with OWL

Onwave has developed our own geofencing platform, OWL working alongside Customers and major works contractors, within high-profile projects to enhance worker safety. In fact, the use of approved geofencing solutions, like OWL, is being mandated by Network Rail on their projects.

OWL is a location-based system that uses geofencing technology to improve project safety, with tangential benefits to productivity, security and the environment. OWL helps teams to visualise and understand their surroundings, and by automatically alerting users to the risks and hazards as they go about their duties (e.g., their proximity to excavations/ Moving Plant).

There are several functions within OWL that help to enhance worker safety, these include: fixed zones, dynamic zones, lone working functionality (for vigilance checks) and Live View the ability for project managers to have an all-seeing overview of the construction site to help spot trends and prevent accidents or incidents

Fixed Zones

Fixed zones can be configured to ensure that your machinery and workers are deployed safely, segregated where possible. Your teams can create safe walking routes to minimise the potential of human-plant interactions on your site. Your teams can also configure zones to prevent interaction with other hazards such as overhead or buried services.

Dynamic Zones

Warn your users when they are getting too close to dangerous heavy plant. Dynamic zones can be created around plant and continually updated based on the location of an OWL Tag (a magnetically mounted tracking and alerting device) which moves with the item of plant.

Rules can be configured on these zones just like other static geofences where unauthorised users can be warned when they are too close. Alerts can also be customised and sent to other users (such as the machine operator or banksmen) to alert them of this interaction.

Management Insights

With OWL you can immediately locate your plant on the interactive Live View map. Your team can provide field teams with all the information they need at their fingertips by attaching documents such as work permits, vehicle routes and risk assessments. Project Managers can verify plant machinery with the proper equipment or training.

Lone Working

With OWL you can easily create safety monitoring policies for individuals, ensuring that your supervisors and managers are informed in the case of an emergency, or when a worker falls or there is a lack of movement for a prolonged period.

Lone workers can even be sent Auto Vigilance checks at regular intervals to confirm that they are safe throughout the day.

We’re Here to Help…

In conclusion, geofencing technology is a valuable tool for construction safety, and for good reason given the startling statistics presented above.

Geofencing provides real-time monitoring, alerts, and data tracking to ensure a safer work environment. By setting virtual boundaries, geofencing helps keep workers informed of potential dangers and can quickly alert managers to any incidents.

With this technology, construction companies can improve their overall safety record, reduce the number of accidents, and increase the efficiency of their operations

If you’re interested in learning more about how geofencing can benefit your construction site, why not schedule a demo today? With a demo, you can see the technology in action and get a better understanding of how it can improve your safety program. Speak to one of our team and gain valuable insights into the benefits of geofencing for your projects.